Point Lookout: a free weekly publication of Chaco Canyon Consulting
Volume 2, Issue 42;   October 16, 2002: Commitment Makes It Easier

Commitment Makes It Easier

by

When you face obstacles, sometimes the path around or through them is difficult. Committing yourself to the path lets you focus all your energy on the path you've chosen.

About 25 kilometers from Guadalajara, Mexico, at the edge of a 15-kilometer-wide caldera, is the little town of La Primavera. Much of the caldera, which is 25,000 years old, is inside a national park, which has numerous hot springs feeding hot streams. And the park is littered with blocks of obsidian, which pre-Columbian peoples used for making blades and weapons. If you're fascinated by archaeology and geology, the La Primavera caldera is a great place for hiking.

A hiker in the La Primavera caldera

A hiker in the La Primavera caldera

On one hot June afternoon, I go hiking with four friends. Going nowhere in particular, the trail crosses the Rio Caliente, which really is a hot river. If you slip or fall in, you not only get wet, you also get a nasty burn.

Approaching the stream, we check it out. The water steams as it sluices between the large rocks that are clearly the trail's intended steppingstones. The rocks are solid, smooth, and spaced a bit too far apart. To make the three leaps, you pretty much have to run, to let your momentum carry you across the gaps. If you stop on a rock, or try to walk instead of run, making the next leap will be tricky — the gaps are a bit long for a standing jump.

We talk it over. Two of us go looking for another way across, but I'm pretty sure they won't find one, because there are no other trails. The far bank is soft and sandy, so despite the steam coming off the water, and with pounding heart, I make a leaping run across. Surprised and relieved, I land on my feet in the sand of the far bank.

My friends now realize regretfully that they'll be doing the same thing. I tell them it's easy if you get a running start. "Right," is the skeptical response. One by one, though, we all get across, and continue our hike.

Sometimes, it's easier if you run.

Sometimes it's
easier if
you run
Facing an obstacle, we usually find several paths to the other side, all difficult. But sometimes proceeding cautiously makes a difficult path even more difficult. Here are some tips for difficult paths.

Take heart from others
When I saw that the trail leading straight across the stream was clear and worn, I felt encouraged. A path might be difficult, but if it's well worn, it's doable.
Commitment makes it easier
If you have to get across, accept that. If there is no easy way, let go of the wish for one. Commit yourself to doing what must be done.
Focus on the goal
Knowing that the far side was soft sand helped me. The goal is probably pretty good — if it weren't, you wouldn't be considering going there. Focus on the goal, not on the difficulty of getting there.

Although difficult paths are often worth traveling, sometimes they're not. You can't tell for sure unless you make the journey. Go to top Top  Next issue: Holey Grails  Next Issue

For more on achieving and inspiring goals, see "Corrales Mentales," Point Lookout for July 4, 2001; "Beyond WIIFM," Point Lookout for August 13, 2003; "Your Wishing Wand," Point Lookout for October 8, 2003; "Give It Your All," Point Lookout for May 19, 2004; "Knowing Where You're Going," Point Lookout for April 20, 2005; "Workplace Myths: Motivating People," Point Lookout for July 19, 2006; "Astonishing Successes," Point Lookout for January 31, 2007; and "Achieving Goals: Inspiring Passion and Action," Point Lookout for February 14, 2007.

Go For It: Sometimes It's Easier If You RunLove the work but not the job? Bad boss, long commute, troubling ethical questions, hateful colleague? This ebook looks at what we can do to get more out of life at work. It helps you get moving again! Read Go For It! Sometimes It's Easier If You Run, filled with tips and techniques for putting zing into your work life. Order Now!

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