Point Lookout: a free weekly publication of Chaco Canyon Consulting
Volume 4, Issue 52;   December 29, 2004: Appreciations

Appreciations

by

When we take time to express to others our appreciation for what they do for us, a magical thing happens.

Another year is ending, and I'm suddenly aware that I've been writing Point Lookout for four years. This issue is my 209th. When I recall how anxious I once was about having enough to say every week, I wonder what I was so worried about. My idea file keeps growing.

Thank You!Doing anything at all for four years rarely happens by chance — it takes intention, determination, and most of all, it takes support from other people. So this week seemed like a good time to express my appreciation for the support you all have given me.

To readers
Point Lookout now (December 2004) has almost 2,000 subscribers. Despite flooded inboxes and hectic interrupt-driven days, many of you spend five or ten minutes a week reading Point Lookout. I appreciate the gift of your time.
To forwarders
Express your appreciation
to those who support
what you do
Motivated by an idea or an insight, and caring about friends, relatives, or colleagues, some of you forward Point Lookout to others, and some of them eventually subscribe. Word of mouth is the most valuable form of marketing there is. Word of mouth isn't for sale, and I appreciate you for passing the word.
To recommenders
At my Web site, on the pages that contain archived back issues, there's a recommend-to-a-friend link that lets readers send articles to friends. I know that when you recommend an article to a friend, you're putting yourself out there, and I appreciate that vote of confidence.
To change-of-address requesters
When you change companies or service providers, many of you send me change-of-address requests. For publishers of free email newsletters, there is no higher compliment, and I appreciate you for sending address changes at what is no doubt a hectic time of transition.
To commenters
I receive a steady stream of comments and feedback from readers, usually about specific articles, but sometimes more general than that. I appreciate the time it takes to frame your thoughts and send me an email message, whether it's a criticism, a suggestion, or encouragement.
To international subscribers
I live and write in the US, in Boston, and — based on email addresses — Point Lookout goes to subscribers in 39 other countries. The actual number of outside-of-the-US addresses is probably even more. I appreciate the Internet for helping me to reach you wherever you are, and I appreciate your willingness to read what I write, despite my writing in what is for many of you a foreign language.

And now, if you like, it can be your turn to express appreciations. Think of something you do often — every day or every week — something that's important to you. Are there people in your life who have made that possible? Maybe you know who they are, and maybe they're close to you. Or maybe you've never met them. Express your appreciation to them for the things they do that make what you do possible and rewarding. You'll feel great, they'll feel great, and you'll both find ways to make it all keep happening. Go to top Top  Next issue: On Beginnings  Next Issue

Rick BrennerThe article you've been reading is an archived issue of Point Lookout, my weekly newsletter. I've been publishing it since January, 2001, free to all subscribers, over the Web, and via RSS. You can help keep it free by donating either as an individual or as an organization. You'll receive in return my sincere thanks — and the comfort of knowing that you've helped to propagate insights and perspectives that can help make our workplaces a little more human-friendly. More

Your comments are welcome

Would you like to see your comments posted here? rbrenlWohNpbzsSgRCeFnner@ChacDIsvSxSsCmAfolBloCanyon.comSend me your comments by email, or by Web form.

About Point Lookout

Thank you for reading this article. I hope you enjoyed it and found it useful, and that you'll consider recommending it to a friend.

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Related articles

More articles on Emotions at Work:

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If you've ever known a particular dog at all well, you've probably been amazed at how easy it is to guess a dog's mood, even though dogs can't speak. Perhaps what's more amazing is that it's so difficult to guess a person's mood, even though humans can speak.
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Our exploration of approaches for dealing with compulsive talkers now concludes, with Part II of a set of suggestions for what to do when peers who talk compulsively interfere with your work.

See also Emotions at Work and Effective Communication at Work for more related articles.

Forthcoming issues of Point Lookout

Five almondsComing October 25: Workplace Memes
Some patterns of workplace society reduce organizational effectiveness in ways that often escape our notice. Here are five examples. Available here and by RSS on October 25.
Terminal 3 of Beijing Capital International AirportAnd on November 1: Risk Creep: I
Risk creep is a term that describes the insidious and unrecognized increase in risk that occurs despite our every effort to mitigate risk or avoid it altogether. What are the dominant sources of risk creep? Available here and by RSS on November 1.

Coaching services

I offer email and telephone coaching at both corporate and individual rates. Contact Rick for details at rbrenTTodsYfRnhAYiuVpner@ChacjKpVREuzDJojykZRoCanyon.com or (617) 491-6289, or toll-free in the continental US at (866) 378-5470.

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