Point Lookout An email newsletter from Chaco Canyon Consulting
Point Lookout, a free weekly email newsletter from Chaco Canyon Consulting
July 6, 2011 Volume 11, Issue 27
 
Recommend this issue to a friend
Join the Friends of Point Lookout
HTML to link to this article…
Archive: By Topic    By Date
Links to Related Articles
Sign Up for A Tip A Day!
Create a perpetual bookmark to the current issue Bookmark and Share
Tweet this! | Follow @RickBrenner Random Article

You Might Be Stressed If...

by

A little stress once in a while keeps us sharp, but chronic intense stress shortens lives. Stress can build gradually, out of our awareness. Here are some indicators of chronic intense stress.
Symptoms of Stage 5 heat stress in cattle

Symptoms of Stage 5 heat stress in cattle include open-mouthed breathing with tongue protruding, and possible drooling. In Stage 6, the most intense, the animal's life is in danger. Certainly it is possible to create a severity ladder for the behavioral indicators of chronic workplace stress. It would be most useful for diagnosing the health of the working environment. Photo courtesy U.S. Department of Agriculture Agricultural Research Service.

When working conditions degrade gradually enough, we tolerate them even though they're intolerable. The cost is chronic high-intensity stress. We become short with each other. We hurt each other. Productivity falls. Quality degrades. Worst of all, we take our troubles home, which can spread the misery and which limits our ability to recharge and repair.

To regain control, we must recognize the indicators of chronic high-intensity stress. Here's a little catalog.

You might be stressed if…

  • …someone asks you for comfort about being stressed, and you blow your top.
  • …you add to your to-do list stuff you've already done, just for that feeling of accomplishment when you check it off.
  • …you suddenly realize that although your desk is usually neat, it's been an unholy mess for three weeks and you never noticed.
  • …you suddenly realize that although you usually don't mind a messy desk, you now feel an overwhelming compulsion to clean it up.
  • …you suddenly realize that 40% of what you've eaten today contains some form of chocolate.
  • …you no longer feel the effects of consuming two espressos before 8 AM.
  • …you take a ten-minute break to relax, but after minute three, all you can think about is whatever you were taking a break from.
  • …sleep mostly consists of waiting to get up until some hour that you think most people would consider reasonable.
  • …you believe that even if you nod off in a meeting, nobody notices, because you do it cleverly.
  • …things that used to be only mildly annoying are now unbearable.
  • …things that used to be unbearable are only mildly annoying compared to the really idiotic stuff that's happening now.
  • …everyone around you seems totally stressed, but you think you're absolutely fine.
  • …everyone around you seems calm, but you think it's because they haven't yet grasped the reality of the situation.
  • …you thought you were decisive before, but now you're making decisions before you realize you've made them.
  • …when you have to decide something, all you can do is dither about it endlessly.
  • …you feel an irresistible urge to make decisions that aren't yours to make.
  • …after you arrive You might be stressed if
    you feel an irresistible
    urge to make decisions
    that aren't yours to make
    wherever you were going, you can't remember why you went there.
  • …even though you're not a VIP, the conference room goes all quiet the moment you enter.
  • …it isn't just that you couldn't keep the thread of what she was saying, it's that you couldn't keep the thread of what you were thinking.
  • …you bite someone's head off over something they had nothing to do with.
  • …two hours late, you realize you missed lunch.
  • …two hours to go, and all you can think about is lunch.
  • ..you've finally figured out how the whole thing fits into a nice, neat pattern.
  • …you believe that you could actually save the company if only they would do it your way.

How many of these indicators seem familiar to you? Go to top Top  Next issue: Power, Authority, and Influence: A Systems View  Next Issue
Bookmark and Share

52 Tips for Leaders of Project-Oriented OrganizationsAre your projects always (or almost always) late and over budget? Are your project teams plagued by turnover, burnout, and high defect rates? Turn your culture around. Read 52 Tips for Leaders of Project-Oriented Organizations, filled with tips and techniques for organizational leaders. Order Now!

Your comments are welcome
Would you like to see your comments posted here? rbrenyhZqTMMfGuLQwxuBner@ChacyMCkvxdnyVNTKXdmoCanyon.comSend me your comments by email, or by Web form.
About Point Lookout

Thank you for reading this article. I hope you enjoyed it and found it useful, and that you'll consider recommending it to a friend.

Point Lookout is a free weekly email newsletter. Browse the archive of past issues. Subscribe for free.

Support Point Lookout by joining the Friends of Point Lookout, as an individual or as an organization.

Do you face a complex interpersonal situation? Send it in, anonymously if you like, and I'll give you my two cents.

Related articles

More articles on Personal, Team, and Organizational Effectiveness:

Pulling at each otherWhen You Think They've Made Up Their Minds
In tough negotiations, when attempts to resolve differences have failed, we sometimes conclude that "they've made up their minds," but other explanations abound. Keeping an open mind about why other people seem to have closed theirs can help us find a resolution.
Huskies along the trail during start day, March 1998, Iditarod Trail Sled Dog RaceTactics for Asking for Volunteers: Part I
CEOs, board chairs, department heads and team leads of all kinds sometimes seek people to handle specific, time-limited tasks. Asking the group for volunteers works fine — usually. There are alternatives.
The Boy Who Cried Wolf, illustrated by Milo Winter in a 1919 Aesop anthologyWhy Don't They Believe Me?
When we want people to believe us, and they don't, it just might be a result of our own actions or demeanor. How does this happen?
An FBI SWAT team assists local law enforcement in New Orleans in August 2005The Paradox of Structure and Workplace Bullying
Structures of all kinds — organizations, domains of knowledge, cities, whatever — are both enabling and limiting. To gain more of the benefits of structure, while avoiding their limits, it helps to understand this paradox and learn to recognize its effects.
A schematic representation of a MOSFETBottlenecks: Part II
When some people take on so much work that they become "bottlenecks," they expose the organization to risks. Managing those risks is a first step to ending the bottlenecking pattern.

See also Personal, Team, and Organizational Effectiveness for more related articles.

Forthcoming Issues of Point Lookout

U.S. Troops in Viet Nam, 1961-1968Coming February 10: Patterns of Conflict Escalation: Part II
When simple workplace disagreements evolve into workplace warfare, they often do so following recognizable patterns. If we can recognize the patterns early, we can intervene to prevent serious damage to relationships. Here's Part II of a catalog of some of those patterns. Available here and by RSS on February 10.
A dense Lodgepole Pine stand in Yellowstone National Park in the United StatesAnd on February 17: Conversation Despots
Some people insist that conversations reach their personally favored conclusions, no matter what others want. Here are some of their tactics. Available here and by RSS on February 17.

Coaching services

I offer email and telephone coaching at both corporate and individual rates. Contact Rick for details at rbrenHzoPtHPscBkwCbSrner@ChacCxsOFHBnsUkCRQvLoCanyon.com or (617) 491-6289, or toll-free in the continental US at (866) 378-5470.

Get the ebook!

Past issues of Point Lookout are available in six ebooks:

Reprinting this article

Are you a writer, editor or publisher on deadline? Are you looking for an article that will get people talking and get compliments flying your way? You can have 500 words in your inbox in one hour. License any article from this Web site. More info

Public seminars

High-Voltage Brainstorming: Leading Teams to More Brilliant Ideas Faster
AlthoHigh-Voltage Brainstormingugh most of us are very familiar with a technique known as brainstorming, many overestimate its effectiveness. Serious research indicates that, as commonly practiced, brainstorming produces results that tend to overlook some brilliant ideas, and might even include ideas that actually have little promise. In this eye opening yet entertaining program, Rick Brenner guides us as we explore the sources of the deficiencies of brainstorming, and then suggests concrete tips for mitigating those deficiencies. Read more about this program. Here's an upcoming date for this program:

Managing in Fluid Environments
Most Managing in Fluid Environmentspeople now work in environments that can best be characterized as fluid, because they're subject to continual change. We never know whats coming next. In such environments, managing — teams, projects, groups, departments, or the enterprise — often entails moving from surprise to surprise while somehow staying almost on track. It's a nerve-wracking existence. This program provides numerous tools that help managers who work in fluid environments. Read more about this program. Here's an upcoming date for this program:

Please donate!The message of Point Lookout is unique. Help get the message out. Please donate to help keep Point Lookout available for free to everyone.
Learn how to spot troubled projects before they get out of control.
Bad boss, long commute, troubling ethical questions, hateful colleague? Learn what we can do when we love the work but not the job.
Learn how to make your virtual global team sing.
Are you managing a change effort that faces rampant cynicism, passive non-cooperation, or maybe even outright revolt?
My free weekly email newsletter gives concrete tips and suggestions for dealing with the challenging but everyday situations we all face.
A Tip a Day arrives by email, or by RSS Feed, each business day. It's 20 to 30 words at most, and gives you a new perspective on the hassles and rewards of work life. Most tips also contain links to related articles. Free!
Learn how to make meetings more productive — and more rare.
Exchange your "personal trade secrets" — the tips, tricks and techniques that make you an ace — with other aces, anonymously. Visit the Library of Personal Trade Secrets.
If your teams don't yet consistently achieve state-of-the-art teamwork, check out this catalog. Help is just a few clicks away!
Ebooks, booklets and tip books on project management, conflict, writing email, effective meetings and more.